Tag Archives: Vampire High

The Czech In In the Mail

16 Oct

     I recently received my contractual copies of the two Vampire High books in Czech. Six each. I’m proud to have them, and they sit proudly on my shelf of personal copies, but I’m pretty sure that my chances to give them away to friends or to use them to promote myself are going to be limited. My stories look impressive though, written down in an alphabet that appears to be made partly of barbed wire. 

The Czech is in the Mail

21 Sep

I heard yesterday that the Czechs have bought the rights to Vampire High and Vampire High S.Y. Nearly all of the money goes right into the coffers of Simon & Schuster to buy them shoes, but still.

Happy.

The Czechs.

I mean, Robots, Hussites, The Good Soldier Schweik, The Little Vixen, Dvorak, The Czech Legion, Kafka and the Golem. They’ve got all that going for them, and they still think publishing a couple of my books will make things better.

Love you, guys. Thanks

P.S. I have nine other books out in English.

TECHNICALLY FAMOUS

14 Sep

A few years ago a slightly seedy librarian of my acquaintance who had secured work as a librarian at a middle school asked me to come over and be famous for fifteen minutes. I knew what to expect: the kids would have no idea who I was, what books I had written, or why they were there. And of course my invitation was unsullied by any mention of payment. Nonetheless, I said yes. I figured once I had done this, the S.S.L. (Slightly Seedy Librarian) would probably never speak to me again, and getting her out of my life forever had a certain charm.

Everything went exactly as I expected. A class of seventh graders was led in to the library, staring blankly at the walls of books, and at me. They sat. And, knowing that they had no idea why this was being done to them, I proceeded to try to put the experience into terms I thought they could understand. I briefly mentioned a few of my books, including Vampire High, the only one that’s ever been optioned for the movies.

“Chris Columbus optioned it,” I said. “The guy who did the Harry Potter movies.”

One pudgy little man down at the far end of the first row raised his pudgy little hand and said, “Well, the Hrry Potter movies were a long time ago, so I don’t think having a movie deal with that guy makes you famous.”

“You’re right,” I said. “I’m not.”

Then another little boy raised his unpudgy hand and declared magnanimously, “I think having any kind of a movie deal makes you technically famous.”

When I was done laughing, I told him that I was going to get  a tee shirt with those words on it, and I eventually did. And I’d suggest to any writers reading this that you do the same. If you don’t need it now, you very well may later. And you don’t need a movie deal to be technically famous. You just have to be a writer.

BTW, I have never heard from the S.S.L. again. So I got paid after all.